Sleeping Murder

Sleeping Murder

Miss Marple's Last Case

Large Print - 1978
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Despite her best efforts, Gwenda is unable to modernize her new home. Worse still, she feels an irrational fear every time she climbs the stairs. With Miss Marple helping to exorcise the ghosts, the two women uncover a crime committed years ago. June Whitfield is Miss Marple in this full-cast Agatha Christie radio drama.
Publisher: Leicester, England : Ulverscroft, 1978, c1976
Edition: Large print ed
ISBN: 9780708901090
0708901093
Branch Call Number: LARGE PRINT Christie 1978
Characteristics: [344] p. ; 22 cm

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janerf
Mar 17, 2020

Totally surprise ending, and totally uncontrived.
This story is entirely wonderful. I was convinced of first one person, then another... and I never got it right.
Delightful!
Totally surprise ending, and totally uncontrived.
This story is entirely wonderful. I was convinced of first one person, then another... and I never got it right.
Delightful!
I am continually amazed at how many gentle homes were kept in the first half of the 20th century, with people who never had to work, yet maintained a full time staff of 4 or 5 people (plus gardeners and chauffers...). Empire was very good for some people...

b
biffblack
Nov 12, 2019

Very entertaining, gripping mystery novel, with a bit of human comedy laced in. Christie's humor lies entirely in her observations of how people interact: the conversation she has with her doctor near the beginning, in which she slyly needles him to diagnose that a seaside visit will be just the thing for what ails her; and the tea she later has with the imperious Eleanor Fane, who keeps interrupting Miss Marple, effusively telling her detective guest everything she wants to know. There's a lot of warmth here -- which is good, because when the killer and their motives are ultimately revealed it's incredibly cold and almost beyond macabre. I could have done without the 3rd to the last chapter, "Which of Them," in which the heroine & her husband rehash theories about the crime in overwhelming detail -- when the reader and Miss Marple already know that these two are so completely on the wrong track. Lovely observations of certain classes within Brit culture and society; the novel often feels like a series of incisive cameos by characters we'd like to get to know better. Edith Pagett, Mrs. Fane, and Major Erskine are all indelibly etched, as was the tragic central figure of Major Halliday, viewed entirely in flashback. Yet how immediate and fresh his suffering feels...

I guessed the killer in this one, but was nevertheless left in a crazy amount of suspense, desperately reading through to see if I was right! One of my favorite Miss Marple mysteries (the others being "A Murder is Announced" and "4:50 from Paddington").

p
pattypi
Jun 15, 2016

Loved this mystery. Miss Marple is her usual helpful self. 😀

I thought I knew who the murderer was several different times. Well worth reading.

EuSei Nov 06, 2015

Another fantastic story from the “Miss Marple” series. Intricate plot that did not show in the movie version of the story. If you read The Duchess of Malfi you might guess who the guilty party is, otherwise, Mrs. Christie will lead you through winding paths to the grand and surprising finale. I always thought Jane Marple was short, but the description of her shows a different sort of lady: “Miss Marple was an attractive old lady, tall and thin, with pink cheeks and blue eyes, and a gentle, rather fussy manner.” This comment by her nephew, Raymond West, will certainly puzzle the ones unacquainted with Victorian sensibilities: “All her dressing tables have their legs swathed in chintz.” I always enjoy Mrs. Christie’s little darts at the “grand” of the world, like in this instance, when Gwenda meets Dr. Penrose and considers that “perhaps psychiatrists always looked a little mad.” Agreed! Enjoyable too are Miss Marple’s witticisms, such as “Gentlemen always seem to be able to tabulate things so clearly.” As this book was written r was written during World War II it portrays a younger Jane Marple. This is a highly enjoyable book and I recommend it for Christie’s fans. I believe the chronological order of the novels (but not as they were written) are as follows: Murder at the Vicarage; The Thirteen Problems (short stories); The Body in the Library; The Moving Finger; Sleeping Murder; A Murder is Announced; 4.50 from Paddington; Greenshaw's Folly; The Mirror Crack'd from Side to Side; A Caribbean Mystery; At Bertram’s Hotel; They Do it with Mirrors; A Pocket Full of Rye; Nemesis 1971; Miss Marple's Final Cases (short stories).

Shsunon Jul 31, 2014

The last Miss Marple mystery!!

p
PegZ
Aug 23, 2013

Get this one again. We didn't have time for it.

a
anindita14
Jan 10, 2012

I enjoyed reading Sleeping Murder. Its a Miss Marple mystery. I have always loved Agatha Christie because of Hercule Poirot, but Miss Marple is just so different yet amazing in her own ways. I think that the book will appeal to any audience and for generations to come. It is a must read. It is un-put-downable in its own way.I loved the characters and how they shape up the story moving in their subtle ways. Its is definitely a must read.

johnsonkjcl Nov 06, 2010

"Sleeping Murder" is a true Agatha Christie classic and one of my favorite mysteries featuring Miss Jane Marple. Even though it was written during WWII, it was the last Miss Marple mystery to be published, appearing in 1976, the year of Agatha Christie’s death.

In "Sleeping Murder", young and newlywed Gwenda Reed comes to England from New Zealand to look for a perfect house for her and her husband who will join her at a later date. Before too long she finds an exactly right house called “Hillside” on the edge of a charming seaside resort. However, the house feels a little too much like home and Gwenda has inkling that she has been there before. But how is that possible? Gwenda was born in India, raised in New Zealand and this is her first time in England or is it not? Soon some strange coincidences cause Gwenda to feel very uneasy. Most disturbing of all is the time when Gwenda’s child memory is triggered during her visit to the theatre and she recalls standing on the landing of her house ”Hillside”, looking through the banister and seeing a young strangled woman lying in the hallway.

Against better judgment and against the advice of kind Miss Marple to let the sleeping murder lie, Gwenda and her husband Giles decide to solve the mystery. Somewhere, there is a murderer who committed an almost perfect crime and has been comforted by the years of safety. Thankfully, there is also charming Miss Marple not only to assist but also to rescue with the aid of insect repellent.

"Sleeping Murder" is a fast paced exciting mystery. The plot is interesting, characters are likeable and well drawn and there is a complex puzzle to solve. I enjoyed this book because of the suspense and the way Agatha Christie presented all the clues. I recommend it to anyone who likes a good book. Remember to treat yourself with a good cup of tea and scones like Miss Marple and her compatriots!

g
GingerKaren
Sep 26, 2005

A young married woman, Gwenda, lands in England to look for a house for her and her husband to live in. He is English and she is from New Zealand, and has never been to England before. After several days of searching, she finds a place that feels like home near Dillmouth and by the sea. As she starts renovations, she is surprised to have certain feelings about how things should be changed: the path to the garden should have steps going down in a particular spot, there should be a doorway through two rooms, and the wall paper she has picked out for an upstairs bedroom should have certain flowers on it. The steps to the garden are easy to remedy, there were steps there before that are now covered by dirt and flowers. Likewise for the door way, it was just walled up! It isn''t until she pries open a closet in the upstairs room and sees that there used to be the exact pattern of wallpaper used in that room years before, that Gwenda starts to feel very uneasy. And then what of the vision she has of a murder in the front hall? Could this be true to life as well? Soon the arrival of her husband sends the both of them off on a chase helped by their new friend Miss Marple that may end in more murder! This is one of the best that Agatha Christie has to offer, and one of my all-time favorites!

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EuSei Nov 07, 2015

EuSei thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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