Tao Te Ching

Tao Te Ching

Book - 2007
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In what may be the most faithful translation of the Tao Te Ching , the translators have captured the terse, enigmatic beauty of the original masterpiece without embellishing it with personal interpretation or bogging it down with explanatory notes. By stepping out of the way and letting the original text speak for itself, they deliver a powerfully direct experience of the Tao Te Ching that is a joy to come back to again and again.

And for the first time in any translation of the Tao Te Ching , now you can interact with the text to experience for yourself the nuanced art of translating. In each of the eighty-one chapters, one significant line has been highlighted and alongside it are the original Chinese characters with their transliteration. You can then turn to the glossary and translate this line on your own, thereby deepening your understanding of the original text and of the myriad ways it can be translated into English.

Complementing the text are twenty-three striking ink paintings brushed by Stephen Addiss and an introduction by the esteemed Asia scholar Burton Watson.
Publisher: Boston : Shambhala : Distributed in the U.S. by Random House, 2007
Edition: 1st Shambhala ed
ISBN: 9781590305461
1590305469
Branch Call Number: 299.51 Laozi
299.51 Laozi
Characteristics: xxx, 122 p. : ill. ; 21 cm

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g
Graeme1998
Nov 14, 2016

This translation of the Tao Te Ching is godawful. The translator is too literal in his interpretation. While a literal translation may be beneficial in other works, the Tao Te Ching is filled with a myriad of metaphors, imagery, and symbols that are not supposed to be literal. In fact, this translation is disrespectful to Laozi. There are many superior translations of the Tao Te Ching. For Example Lin Yutang's translation: http://terebess.hu/english/tao/yutang.html

morrisonist Mar 29, 2016

casting hexagrams is an interesting new idea

MarioEnriqueRiosPinot Aug 31, 2015

I just read this wonderful read and I'd like to read it again. The question is how do I live in the world since I am of the world and still deal with the yin and yang?

r
rjchapple
Aug 05, 2015

Classic Taoist text. Would be well read as a daily devotional, since the contained wisdom is best digested bit at a time.

m
melkweg
Jul 03, 2015

This is the very best rendition of the Tao per Lao Tzu, a poetic translation in the modern sense which does not attempt to lecture the reader on the core meaning of the work. Instead, it allows one to draw one's own conclusions. The translation notes included are there mostly for the scholar, or to clarify translation choices. If you are new to this work, this is the version to read.

p
patrickeglaston
Jun 30, 2015

ive had and read this book for decades. my best friend read it everyday and probably still reads it. I currently do not have a copy and recomemend anyone to check it out from the library. I am Christian and really love Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu translated by Gia Fu Feng and Jane English.

n
nnicoles
May 31, 2015

This book is seriously misfiled.

p
pigpigmonster
Oct 25, 2013

classic

g
goldenguppy
Dec 10, 2010

A superb translation of this piece of ancient philosophy. I would recommend anyone trying to explore Taoism to read this.

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dejesusa1
Nov 18, 2016

dejesusa1 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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melkweg
Jul 03, 2015

melkweg thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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