Twelve Breaths A Minute

Twelve Breaths A Minute

End-of-life Essays

Book - 2011
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"A gripping and passionate account of how we face the final rite of passage. These stories mine the agility of the human spirit, and will not easily be forgotten."--Danielle Ofri, author of  Medicine in Translation  and  Singular Intimacies
Twelve Breaths a Minute --the latest collaboration between SMU Press and the Creative Nonfiction Foundation, with the support of the Jewish Healthcare Foundation--features twenty-three original, compelling personal narratives that examine the way we as a society care for the dying. Here a poet, a former hospice worker, reflects on death's mysteries; a son wanders the halls of his mother's nursing home, lost in the small absurdities of the place; a grief counselor struggles with losing his own grandfather; a medical intern traces the origins of time and the quality of our final days; a mother anguishes over her decision to turn off her daughter's life support and allow her organs to be harvested; and an emergency dispatcher tries to quantify what a stranger's death should mean.
"This remarkable anthology collects the reflections of family members, nurses, physicians, and hospice workers as they care for the dying. Looking back on their experiences, they ponder what they did well and what they might have done differently or not done at all. They despair over flailing efforts to do something when that can only prolong misery. Biomedical technology is sometimes a blessing and sometimes a curse, and never sufficient in itself.  Readers, who will at some time be in one or more of these caregiving roles, can learn important and valuable information from these reflections."--Carol Donley, former co-director of the Center for the Literature, Medicine, and the Health Care Professions and co-author of Literature and Aging: An Anthology

Publisher: Dallas : Southern Methodist University Press, 2011
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780870745713
0870745719
Branch Call Number: 616.029 Twelve 2011
Characteristics: xviii, 267 p. ; 24 cm
Additional Contributors: Gutkind, Lee

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m_ms_uk
Aug 31, 2016

Why is it so traumatic, I have just been through the toughest year of my life trying to deal with the death of my Love and my father and there have been many times when I thought that being dead myself would surely be better than trying to deal with the death of two people that were a significant part of my life and all the misery that went with it. What I want to know is, what is the point of grief, why is it so awful to the point that you feel your own life is not worth living, why is the experience so shocking and what do we really gain from it. I know I am not the same person and that everything is different now, I don't view that as a bad thing really but what it took me to get to the other side of this is something I find hard to deal with and I wonder what your thoughts are on grief? Can we ignore it and just get on with our lives because some people seem able to do that, whereas I couldn't carry on, I couldn't even function at all for months and months. Maybe that's a tough journey

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