Get Well Soon

Get Well Soon

History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them

Book - 2017
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"A witty, irreverent tour of history's worst plagues--from the Antonine Plague to leprosy to polio--and a celebration of the heroes who fought them. In 1518, in a small town in Alsace, Frau Troffea began dancing and didn't stop. She danced until she was carried away six days later, and soon 34 more villagers joined her. Then more. In a month more than 400 people had died from the mysterious dancing plague. In late-seventeenth-century England an eccentric gentleman founded the No Nose Club in his gracious townhome--a social club for those who had lost their noses, and other body parts, to the plague of syphilis, for which there was then no cure. And in turn-of-the-twentieth-century New York, an Irish cook caused two lethal outbreaks of typhoid fever, a case that transformed her into the notorious Typhoid Mary. Throughout time, humans have been terrified and fascinated by the diseases history and circumstance have dropped on them. Some of their responses to these outbreaks are, in hindsight, almost too strange to believe. Get Well Soon delivers the gruesome, morbid details of some of the worst plagues we've suffered as a species, as well as stories of the heroic figures who selflessly fought to ease the suffering of their fellow man. With her signature mix of in-depth research and storytelling, and not a little dark humor, Jennifer Wright explores history's most gripping and deadly outbreaks and ultimately looks at the surprising ways they've shaped history and humanity for almost as long as anyone can remember."-- Provided by publisher.
Publisher: New York :, Henry Holt and Company,, 2017
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: © 2017
ISBN: 9781627797467
1627797467
Branch Call Number: 614.4 Wright 2017
Characteristics: xii, 320 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm

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JEM_LPL
Feb 07, 2018

Few people think of plagues, pestilences and disfiguring illnesses as places to go looking for laughs. That said, Wright's second book is a hilarious look at the various epidemics that have plagued humankind for centuries--and the novel ways that people have invented to fight them. (Ever heard of the exploding frog cure?) It will make you laugh so hard your stitches hurt.

trekkiekat Jun 21, 2017

I really wanted to like this book. The humour at times was great! However, I could not get past the shear volume of factual errors and the quoting of outdated sources to prove a point or make a joke. This book makes "nice" story connections and interpretations by selectively quoting and stretching historical facts. Big disappointment overall as I love the history of medicine. I don't care that she happily advertises herself as not being a scientist, that does not excuse her obvious lack of knowledge on the basics of her book's core content.

p
phlily
Apr 07, 2017

Phenomenal. And I cried on the train reading about our hero Father Damian.

c
ClaireM_W
Apr 01, 2017

I love medical histories, and this one is genuinely fun to read. A million years ago, long before antibiotics learned chemistry and turned traitor, I was an R.N., and when we were over tired and a little giddy, we'd sometimes tell a gallows joke. This author has a few for every god-awful disease out there. There's no mention of medical experience in her history, but I'll bet a Toonie she was in medicine in a previous life. Loved this book.

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